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Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. This can lead to problems with your heart, muscles, and bones. Hyperthyroidism is most common in women over the age of 50 but can also occur in younger women. Symptoms of hyperthyroidism include feeling tired all the time, having a fast heartbeat, sweating a lot, and having trouble sleeping. If you think you may have hyperthyroidism, see your doctor for an evaluation. There are treatments available that can help manage the condition.

What are the symptoms of hyperthyroidism?

The symptoms of hyperthyroidism can vary depending on the person, but may include: a fast heartbeat, feeling warm all the time, being overly tired, having a strong appetite, and hair loss. If you notice any of these symptoms, it's important to see your doctor for an evaluation. Hyperthyroidism is a serious condition that can be treated with medication or surgery.

What are the causes of hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. There are many possible causes of hyperthyroidism, but some of the most common include:

There are many possible causes of hyperthyroidism but some of the most common include:

Graves' disease - an autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks its own thyroid gland

Thyroid cancer -the most common typeofcancer affectingthe thyroidsuch that it can be fatalifnottreatedquickly

Radiationtherapytotheheadorneck -exposuretothereductiontherapyfordeathcandamageyourthyrondrugsthatleadtomhyperthyroidism

Medicationssuchasbetablockers(forthehighbloodpressure),"lithium"(bipolardisorder),"anticonvulsants(forsleepseizures),"antidepressants(forthedepression),"calciumchannelblockers(tobetreatedhighbloodpressure),"birthcontrolpills(topreventpregnancy),"opioids(usedfortopainreliefincludingaftersurgery)" ,"andothersmaycausehyperthyoidishypothyrexinembyincreasingproductionoftyroxineinthebody."Someexamplesincludebetablockersusedforthehighbloodpressure;"lithiumusedform bipolardisorder;"anticonvulsantsusedforsleepseizures;"antidepressantsusedforthedepression;"calciumchannelblockersusedtocontrolhighbloodpressure;"birthcontrolpillstakenbynwomentopreventpregnancy;"opioidsusethatareinpainreliefincludingaftersurgery,"andsomeothersmaybeinvolved.

  1. Graves’ disease: This is an autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks its own thyroid gland. The most common symptoms of Graves’ disease are increased appetite and weight gain, dry skin, and a rapid heart rate.
  2. Thyroid cancer: This is the most common type of cancer affecting the thyroid gland. Thyroid cancer can be fatal if not treated quickly. Symptoms of thyroid cancer may include a lump or swelling on your neck, hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, fatigue, and cold hands and feet.
  3. Radiation therapy to the head or neck: Exposure to radiation therapy to the head or neck can damage your thyroid gland and lead to hyperthyroidism. Signs and symptoms of radiation therapy-related hyperthyroidism may include fever, feeling tired all the time, trouble sleeping, mood changes (such as irritability), muscle weakness, and a fast heartbeat.
  4. Medications such as beta blockers (for hypertension), lithium (for bipolar disorder), anticonvulsants (for seizures), antidepressants (for depression), calcium channel blockers (to treat high blood pressure), birth control pills (to prevent pregnancy), antipsychotics (to treat schizophrenia), corticosteroids (used for various conditions such as asthma or Crohn’s disease), opioids (used for pain relief including after surgery) ,and others: Many medications can cause hyperthyroidism by increasing production of thyroxine in the body. Some examples include beta blockers used for hypertension; lithium used for bipolar disorder; anticonvulsants used for seizures; antidepressants used for depression; calcium channel blockers used to treat high blood pressure; birth control pills taken by women to prevent pregnancy; antipsychotics used to treat schizophrenia; corticosteroids used for various conditions such as asthma or Crohn’s disease ; opioids used for pain relief including after surgery ;and others .

How is hyperthyroidism treated?

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. Treatment typically includes reducing the amount of thyroid hormone produced, using medications to control symptoms, and/or surgery to remove or reduce the size of the thyroid gland. Hyperthyroidism can be life-threatening if not treated properly.

Is hyperthyroidism curable?

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. This can lead to problems such as weight gain, heart disease, and difficulty breathing. There is no cure for hyperthyroidism, but treatment can help manage the condition. Some people may be able to control their symptoms with medication alone, while others may need surgery or radiation therapy. If you are experiencing signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism, it is important to see your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

What are the complications of untreated hyperthyroidism?

There are a number of complications that can arise from untreated hyperthyroidism, including: heart problems, stroke, infertility, nerve damage, and bone loss. Additionally, people with hyperthyroidism often have an increased risk of developing other medical conditions, such as diabetes and obesity. If left untreated, hyperthyroidism can lead to serious health problems or even death. If you think you may have hyperthyroidism, please seek immediate medical attention.

Canhyperthyroidism lead to death?

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much hormone. This can lead to problems such as weight gain, heart disease, and stroke. However, hyperthyroidism can also lead to death. Hyperthyroidism is the most common cause of death in women over 50 years old and the third most common cause of death in women overall. In men, hyperthyroidism is the second most common cause of death after heart disease. There are several ways that hyperthyroidism can lead to death:

  1. Thyroid cancer: If you have hyperthyroidism and your thyroid gland becomes cancerous, it can spread to other parts of your body and kill you.
  2. Heart failure: If your thyroids are producing too much hormone, it can damage your heart muscle and lead to heart failure. This is especially dangerous if you have diabetes or high blood pressure because it makes these conditions worse.
  3. Stroke: A sudden increase in thyroid hormones levels can cause a stroke. Symptoms include trouble speaking, numbness or tingling on one side of the body, chest pain, confusion, or loss of consciousness.
  4. Death from respiratory failure: If you have uncontrolled hyperthyroidism, your thyroids may produce too much air pollution (known as “thyrotoxicosis”). This excess air pollution can interfere with your breathing and eventually kill you.

How can I prevent hyperthyroidism?

There are a few things you can do to help prevent hyperthyroidism. Make sure you get enough exercise, eat a balanced diet, and avoid smoking. If you do develop hyperthyroidism, your doctor may prescribe medication to lower your thyroid hormone levels.

How do I know if I havehyperthyroidism?

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, it is likely that you have hyperthyroidism: increased heart rate, sweating, feeling anxious or out of breath, feelings of being out of control, trouble sleeping, and feeling restless. If you are experiencing two or more of these symptoms for more than a month, it is important to see a doctor for an evaluation. Hyperthyroidism can be treated with medication and/or surgery.

Who is at risk for developing hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. This can lead to problems such as weight gain, increased heart rate, and irregular menstrual cycles. There is no one definitive cause of hyperthyroidism, but it can be caused by a number of factors including an overactive thyroid gland, radiation therapy, Graves’ disease (a disorder that causes the body to produce too many antibodies), and autoimmune diseases. The most common age group affected by hyperthyroidism is middle-aged women, but it can also occur in children and older adults. If you are at risk for developing hyperthyroidism, your doctor will perform a series of tests to determine if you have the condition and if so, what steps need to be taken to treat it.

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